Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Dr Lee John Curley

Dr Lee John Curley

Profile summary

  • Central Academic Staff
  • Lecturer in Psychology
  • Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
  • School of Psychology & Counselling
  • Psychology
  • lee.curley

Professional biography

Dr Lee John Curley graduated in July 2014 from Edinburgh Napier University with a BSc (hons) degree in psychology. In January 2015, he began his PhD in juror decision making, which utilised theory from both forensic and cognitive psychology. During his PhD, he actively published several papers, mostly focussing on the areas of juror decision making, decision science, and eyewitness testimony. Lee submitted his PhD in January 2018 and graduated with his doctorate in July 2018. Throughout his career, he has written blogs, published in media-outlets (e.g., the Conversation and the Scotsman), presented at public engagement events (the Edinburgh Science Festival), presented at international conferences, and was invited to give a talk to Edinburgh’s Faculty of Advocates. Lee began working for the Open University in June 2019 and is looking forward to contributing to the University and its students.

Research interests

Broadly my research interests relate to forensic cognition, and more specifically, I am interested in cognitive bias, rationality and decision making. Despite, my previous research being primarily centred on forensic psychology, I am keen to investigate decision processes in other applied environments (i.e. finance, medicine and marketing).

Teaching interests

My main teaching interests relate to cognitive psychology, statistics and experimental design, forensic psychology and individual differences. For more information on teaching interests, please see here: https://oupsychology.wordpress.com/2019/09/01/introducing-new-academics-in-the-school-dr-lee-curley/

 

Impact and engagement

Book Chapter: 

1)  Curley, L. J. (2017). Decision Making Process of Jurors. In B. Baker, R. Minhas, L. Wilson (eds.). Factbook: Psychology and Law (2nd ed.). Kelowna: European Association of Psychology and Law Student Society.

 

Media-outlet publications:

1)  Curley, L.J. (2019, September 23rd). The Anglo-American jury system: is there another way? [Blog post]. Retrieved from: https://oucriminology.wordpress.com/

2)  Curley, L. J. (2018, December 11th). Scotland’s ‘not proven’ verdict helps juries communicate their belief of guilt when lack of evidence fails to convict. The conversation. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/scotlands-not-proven-verdict-helps-juries-communicate-their-belief-of-guilt-when-lack-of-evidence-fails-to-convict-108286

3)  Curley, L. J. (2018, September 5th). How juror bias can be tackled to ensure fairer trials. The conversation. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/how-juror-bias-can-be-tackled-to-ensure-fairer-trials-100476

4)  Curley, L. J., MacLean, R., & Murray, J. (2017, May 2nd). People make terrible eyewitnesses – but it turns out there’s an exception. The Conversation. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/people-make-terrible-eyewitnesses-but-it-turns-out-theres-an-exception-77033.

5)  Curley, L.J. (2017, April 3rd). Decision Making Theory and its Implications for Policing [Blog post]. Retrieved from: https://bscpolicingnetwork.com/2017/04/03/decision-making-theory-and-its-implications-for-policing/. Republished in Policing Insight.

6)  Curley, L. J. (2017, January 18th). To win a Scottish indyref2, yes side must learn lessons of Brexit victory. The Conversation. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/to-win-a-scottish-indyref2-yes-side-must-learn-lessons-of-brexit-victory-71446.

7)  Curley, L. J. (2016, December 1st). Jury still out on merits of the Not Proven verdict. The Scotsman. Retrieved from: http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/jury-still-out-on-merits-of-the-not-proven-verdict-1-4305100.

 

Engagement with the Media:

1)  Police Professional magazine;

2)  The National;

3)  Evening Telegraph.

 

Invited talks and public engagement presentations at:

1)  The Centre for Policing Research and Learning (2019);

2)  The Faculty of Advocates, Edinburgh (2018);

3)  The University of Edinburgh (2018);

4)  Edinburgh Science Festival (2018);

5)  Knowledge exchange for Barclays bank (2017);

6)  Edinburgh Napier University (2016).

 

Conference presentations at:

1)  The Annual Postgraduate Conference for the School of Applied Sciences at Edinburgh Napier University (2015; 2016; 2017);

2)  The Social Science School launch at Edinburgh Napier University: “Power, Policy and Practice” (2017);

3)  The International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services (IAFMHS) Conference in Split, Croatia (2017);

4)  The Postgraduate Forensic Psychology and Criminology Research Network (POPCORN) at Edinburgh Napier University (2016; 2017);

5)  The International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services (IAFMHS) Conference at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, USA (2016);

6)  Edinburgh Napier University’s Research in Progress seminar (2016);

7)  The Humanities and Social Sciences in the Digital Age Graduate School Conference at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (2016);

8)  The European Association of Psychology and Law (EAPL) Conference in Nuremberg, Germany (2015);

9)  The British Psychological Society’s Undergraduate Conference at Edinburgh Napier University (2014).

 

Conferences Organised:

1)  The Postgraduate Forensic Psychology and Criminology Research Network (2016; 2017);

2)  The Annual Postgraduate Conference for the School of Applied Sciences at Edinburgh Napier University (2017);

3)  Social Science School launch at Edinburgh Napier University: “Power, Policy and Practice” (2017).

External collaborations

1) The Scottish Ambulance Service. 

Publications

Assessing cognitive bias in forensic decisions: A review and outlook (2020)
Curley, Lee J.; Munro, James; Lages, Martin; MacLean, Rory and Murray, Jennifer
Journal of Forensic Sciences ((In Press))
The bastard verdict and its influence on jurors (2019-12)
Curley, Lee J.; MacLean, Rory; Murray, Jennifer; Laybourn, Phyllis and Brown, David
Medicine, Science and the Law, 59(1) (pp. 26-35)
Threshold point utilisation in juror decision-making (2019)
Curley, Lee J.; MacLean, Rory; Murray, Jennifer; Pollock, Andrew C. and Laybourn, Phyllis
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 26(1) (pp. 110-128)
Decision Science: A New Hope (2018)
Curley, Lee J.; MacLean, Rory; Murray, Jennifer and Laybourn, Phyllis
Psychological Reports, 122(6) (pp. 2417-2439)
Faith in thy threshold (2018)
Curley, Lee J.; Murray, Jennifer; MacLean, Rory; Laybourn, Phyllis and Brown, David
Medicine, Science and the Law, 58(4) (pp. 239-250)
The Relationship between the Big 5 Personality Traits and Eyewitness Recognition (2017)
Curley, Lee J.; MacLean, Rory and Murray, Jennifer
Journal of Articles in Support of the Null Hypothesis, 13(2)
Are consistent juror decisions related to fast and frugal decision making? Investigating the relationship between juror consistency, decision speed and cue utilisation (2017)
Curley, Lee J.; Murray, Jennifer; MacLean, Rory and Laybourn, Phyllis
Medicine, Science and the Law, 57(4) (pp. 211-219)
Heuristics: The good, the bad, and the biased. What value can bias have for decision makers? (2016)
Curley, Lee J.; Murray, J. and MacLean, R.
Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group Quarterly(100) (pp. 41-44)

Request your prospectus

Request a prospectus icon

Explore our qualifications and courses by requesting one of our prospectuses today.

Request prospectus

Are you already an OU student?

Go to StudentHome